Comics Review – LaGuardia by Nnedi Okorafor and Tana Ford

LaGuardia is a 4-issue series written by Hugo award winning author Nnedi Okorafor with art by Tana Ford. The series is part of the Berger Books imprint at Dark Horse that's run by legendary former Vertigo editor Karen Berger. Taking place an indeterminate amount of time in the future, LaGuardia finds an Earth where aliens are now integrated with human society. Future, a pregnant Nigerian-American doctor, is returning home to New York City after several years living in Lagos, Nigeria. Future's stated reason for returning home is to raise her child at home in America, but some mystery surrounds Citizen, the father of her child, and the sentient illegal plant named Letme Live that Future has smuggled into the United States.

Comics Review – Batman: Blink by Dwayne McDuffie and Val Semeiks

Batman: Blink collects issues 156-158 and issues 164-167 of the original Legends of the Dark Knight series. Originally published in 2002 and 2003, it's written by Dwyane McDuffie and drawn by Val Semeiks. There are two different stories collected here. The first is the initial 3-issue Batman: Blink storyline and the second has the pair returning to the same characters a short time later in the Legends of the Dark Knight series.

Comics Review – Bitter Root, Vol. 1 by David F. Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene

As part of an effort to boost Black voices in the comics and book community, I'm trying to mostly only read works by Black writers and artists for the month of June. This time I pulled down one I've been looking forward to for a while. Bitter Root , Vol. 1 collects the first 5 issues of the series written by David F. Walker and Chuck Brown and drawn by Sanford Greene. A sci-fi/horror series about a family of Black monster hunters living in 1920's Harlem, it felt like a natural fit to read this month.

Comics Roundup – Week of 6/10

I'm a subscriber to both Marvel Unlimited and DC Universe, so I'm perpetually behind current releases, but I get to read just about everything from those two companies at like 10% of what it'd normally cost. Every week I peruse the "new" releases to the services and catch up on most of what gets added. This week, I figured I'd do a roundup of the comics I read that finished up some volumes and give a brief review for each. Check them out below!

Supporting Black Writers – Fiction Recommendations

I was writing a review today about a superhero comic book today and frankly it felt like a pointless thing to be doing this week. Instead, inspired by my friend at Words for Worms, I'm just going to list some of my favorite books and comics written by Black creators in my favorite genres. There's a ton of material going around about anti-racist material written by Black people. These books, poems, films, TV shows, etc are essential, but it seems vitally important to support Black creators in their endeavors that aren't just about explicitly tackling racism. I've put together a short and not-at-all comprehensive of some of my favorite recent fiction from Black creators. Black Lives Matter. Black Art Matters.

Comics Review – Something Is Killing the Children, Volume 1 by James Tynion IV and Werther Dell’Edera

Something Is Killing the Children is a new series from BOOM! Studios written by James Tynion IV and drawn Werther Dell'Edera, with Miguel Muerto on colors. This first volume of the series finds a small town plagued by a number of missing and murdered children. Not great! When one kid named James does return, the police don't believe his gruesome story of monsters in the woods being responsible for the dismemberment of his friends. The mystery escalates when a woman going by Erica Slaughter shows up in town, saying she believes James and that she's come to take care of the problem.

Comics Review – Something New by Lucy Knisley

Something New is a graphic memoir from Lucy Knisley. This is the third of Knisley's books that I've read, all of which have been auto-biographical and none of which I've read in order. It's an interesting experience getting different snippets of Knisley's life a bit out of order. I first read An Age of License (which is good) and then read Relish (which is magnificent). I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books I'd read and was very excited to read Something New.

Comics Review – Green Lantern: Legacy by Minh Lê and Andie Tong

Green Lantern: Legacy finds a brand new take on Green Lantern, albeit featuring some familiar faces. The main character of the book is 13 year old Tai Pham. Tai's grandmother is a Vietnamese immigrant who owns a local neighborhood shop called the Jade Market. What Tai soon finds out is that there's a lot more to his grandmother than he knows. These developments launch him into his adventure as a full-fledged member of the Green Lantern Corp.

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